100 years after Tulsa race massacre, African Americans still feel outcast

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AFP

Tulsa (United States) (AFP) – At the foot of modern buildings on an anonymous street, a few discreet metal plaques catch the eye. “Grier shoemaker,” “Earl real estate” — riveted to the ground, they bear the names of Black-owned businesses that once stood there before being destroyed during one of the worst racial massacres in the United States, in 1921. A rare vestige of a neighborhood so prosperous it was called Black Wall Street, the plaques prove that the history of Greenwood — a historically Black neighborhood of Tulsa, Oklahoma — is understood not by the monuments that currently stand,…

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