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'Heat Dome' To Roast Northeast States 

‘Heat Dome’ To Roast Northeast States 

Time for those living in Mid-Atlantic and Northeast states to turn their thermostats down as the second heat wave of the year begins and will last through mid-week. 

Residents from the Baltimore–Washington metropolitan area up to Boston will experience temperatures well above 90-degrees today through Wednesday. 

Temperatures will climb 5 to 10 above average, even as much as 14 degrees above normal for specific areas in the final days of June. 

“A bulge northward in the jet stream pattern will allow for a dome of heat to build across the eastern US into the new week from the Appalachian Mountains east to the coast,” AccuWeather Meteorologist Matt Benz said.

Increased warmth will also coincide with increasingly humid conditions that may result in isolated afternoon thunderstorms, especially in the higher terrain of the Appalachians. 

By Sunday afternoon, metros across the I-95 corridor such as Washington D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City, and Boston will print 90 degrees. 

On Monday, the heat dome is expected to worsen with temperatures printing into the upper 90s to near 100 degrees from Washington DC to Boston. 

A full-blown heat wave will result in higher power prices for Mid-Atlantic and Northeast states. Already, power prices are creeping higher early Sunday morning, and one would expect prices to increase over the coming days during peak hours. 

Simultaneously, an unprecedented heat wave is striking the Northwest where temperatures are 10 to 20 degrees above average – many homes in those states don’t have air condition. 

Meanwhile, the western half of the US has been experiencing a megadrought producing fallow lands that may spark a grasshopper plague which would decimate crops. 

Tyler Durden
Sun, 06/27/2021 – 13:30

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